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I am a quilter living in Woodbridge, Suffolk who has made quilts since I was a teenager. I also ring bells! Both are great British traditions....I will try to feature some of my antique Welsh and Durham quilts, the quilts I make myself, my quilting activities and also some of my bellringing achievements. Plus as many photos as I can manage. NB: Double click on the photos to see greater detail, then use back button to return to the main page.













Wednesday, 13 March 2019

Romford Embroiderers


Last Saturday, I drove down the A12 towards London, to give a talk in Romford.
Luckily, the venue was very easy to find. The group has about 60 members, and there were a number of visitors to see the quilts. From the comments afterwards, the talk was enjoyed, with the pieces flowers and vegetables to Ruth McDowells patterns making a special impact. I am always happy to share my quilts!

Tuesday, 5 March 2019

Woodbridge Tide Mill

From September 2018, I have had a new accounts job - administrator at Woodbridge Tide Mill.
This working mill is one of only two Grade 1 listed buildings in Woodbridge - the other is St Marys Church on the marketplace. It is one of only two working tide mills in Britain - the other is in Pembroke, Wales.


The Tide Mill is now a "living museum", with milling demonstrations taking place when the tides allow. The present mill pond is much smaller than the original - this was sold off separately and is now a boat marina. The new smaller mill pond only holds enough water to turn the mill wheel for about thirty minutes.


Flour is available in two grades - Strong, for bread making, and fine for cakes and pastry.
The flour is sold to visitors and also to local bakeries and supermarkets, all made with locally grown wheat.


The original machinery is still in use.



As administrator, I do the bookkeeping, pay expenses and wages, and also take minutes at management meetings. Its quite a change from my other bookkeeping jobs!

Thursday, 28 February 2019

Quilts at St Fagans

Some of the quilts that we saw during our visit to St Fagans..






















Monday, 18 February 2019

BQSG meeting - Cardiff - St Fagans

At the end of October 2018, the British Quilt Study Group held its annual seminar at Cardiff, near to St Fagans National Museum of History.  
 
 
Our hotel was adequate! and the nearest to St Fagans open air museum.
 

Some Welsh quilts are on display, in a new display area which focuses on crafts, livelihoods and making a living.


The glass causes reflections....


These buildings have been relocated from other places in Wales - a water mill -

A farm house....
 
The weaving shed, with the great spinning wheel. We had an interesting talk to the weaver. dyeing is done in the summer only, so that the dyed cloth can dry in the sun. Weaving is done throughout the year.
 

The working mans institute...
The tailors shop...
Quilt in one of the older buildings...


A building relocated from the border with Herefordshire...

Interior of the above building....

A Unitarian church interior. The box pews were maintained by different families, hence the variations seen....

Gardens at St Fagans Castle, a grand house...

....
and the castle itself, a rather grand house that I did not have time to look around. I had to quickly walk back to the main building where we were having  display of quilts and other items from the collections. I have long wanted to go to St Fagans and the Museum of Wales, so I am glad that I at last had the oppertunity to go there with BQSG.

Wednesday, 6 February 2019

St Fagans Miners Cottages

Rhyd-Y-Car Terrace
Possibly the most iconic buildings to be seen at St Fagans is this row of miners' cottages. These were built about 1800, in Merthyr Tydfil. It was then the largest town in Wales, and the world leader in iron production - a boom town. The houses were built by an iron master to house his workers.
 

These cottages were better quality than many in Merthyr. Built of stone, they were one up and one down, with a small extension to the back. A small circular stairs led upstairs to a small room. By 1891 the houses were considered outdated, but people were reluctant to leave. In 1935 the local authoirty condemned the terrace. Finally in 1979 a flood brought the terrace to a sad end. They were dismantled and moved to St Fagans in 1982-83. The cottages have been refurnished in a variety of different periods.
1985
1985
1985
Pidgeon loft from the 1960's
Other cottages were furnished as 1925,1895,1855 and 1805. Can you guess which?






 





Garden allotments
1805

1805